Young Fulltime RVers – Too much "together" time?

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June 4, 2009

Hello campers,

Fulltime RVers live in small spaces and are together a lot. How best to cope? Video host Evanne Schmarder shares a few of her tips and tricks on this topic in this episode of Young Full-time RVers.

And you know it, fulltime RVers are plentiful these days – maybe you are one of them. What do you think about this topic and how do handle the vast amount of “together time”? Leave a comment below so we can all benefit from your experience.

Happy and safe travels,

Evanne

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12 comments

  1. Hello your majesty, the Queen,

    What a great article. I think your 3 principals apply to not only vacation or full time RVing but to life, marriage, and all relationships of leisure.

    Thanks for sharing and happy travels…

  2. woof

    My wife and I both have different hats and when one of us wears his hat it means , don’t bother me now.

  3. My wife’s biggest complaint: I keep “getting underfoot” ! 🙂 LOL When go camping, usually, it is to see family we haven’t seen in a while. She complains that I still ”get underfoot”! Just can win! LOL
    You do make some very good points. Thanks! 🙂

  4. Honeybear

    Just like at home, we have our own separate checklist and responsibilities. Obviously, mine is more mechanically oriented (checking the tires, appliances, fluid levels, etc.) We respect each other’s “space” and know it’s not the best time to converse when one of us is reviewing our checklist or going through one of our “routines” because we need to focus on what we are doing at that moment. Casual conversation can wait. The risk is that something will be forgotten or left undone. It’s one thing to forget a food item, but quite another to forget to lower the antenna, or something similar that could involve safety or unnecessary expense.
    Case in point –too many distractions while backing the RV into the driveway could result in a minor accident (yeah -did that one).

    Focus on the important things, don’t be too serious and remember that it’s supposed to be fun (whether a vacation from work or retirement).

  5. Wow, what terrific and creative methods for carving out your own time! Bravo!

    We, too, Honeybear, have found that when arriving or leaving distractions can be a big problem. Point well shared.

    Hey, Patrick – maybe you need a “hat” system like woof – seems to work there. It’s tough not to be underfoot in an RV, right!

  6. Liz Bard

    My husband hasn’t been able to drive since 2002 because of a brain tumor. We have to travel 120 miles to Shreveport to the VA. After we get home, I go out on the back porch to decompress before I can even think to cook dinner (unless we ate out). We just got a RV in March and after I have driven and parked, my husband goes outside to make sure the jacks are down, then he hooks up electric, etc. I have opened the slide for the DR/LR and then get me a snack, something to drink and a book and go outside. In the meantime, he has come in and turned on the tv. After about 30 minutes I can come in to watch tv, cook, etc.

    We have been married 36 years. We were married by a chaplain who gave us premartial counseling and we had to take a car ride for at least 8 hours, with no one else or the radio for distraction. We had a day and a half trip from Ohio to Mass. and planned the wedding, the budget, etc and this was before seeing the chaplain.

  7. Hi Liz,

    How interesting on the premarital counseling…do they use that technique anymore? Pretty good idea! Has anyone else had that advice/experience?

    Driving the rig takes alot of concentration and decompression is needed – in whatever form works. Your plan sounds like a winner. When I worked in corporate America I always needs 30 minutes after arriving home to just “be” – then I could get back in the game – prepare dinner, etc.

    Thanks for sharing and best to you and your husband,

    Evanne
    http://www.RVCookingShow.com

  8. Bob Reising

    I love the comment that this is valuable for all parts of married life, not just RVing. We dove right in with a 32′ class A and have been “learning on the fly”. I was getting pretty tense and short-tempered at the beginning when I realized (she told me) I was being a real a_s at times. This was supposed to be fun! You must force yourself to put on a smile and remember how lucky you are compared to many. Nothing should allow you to be that nasty! What a blessing it is to have this lifestyle and meet other like-minded RVers.

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