Stress-Free Travel with Your Pet

author image

March 19, 2009

dog-smileIt’s tough to enjoy a vacation if you’re forced to leave the family pet behind. That’s why more and more people are taking their pets with them – and RVing is the most pet-friendly way to travel. These simple, but important, steps will ensure your road trip with your pet is fun and stress-free.



1. Visit the Vet.

You want make sure your pet is healthy enough for travel and that the immunizations are up to date. Get whatever medication your pet may need.

2. Do Your Research.

Always call all the campgrounds you plan to visit in advance. Confirm whether the campgrounds allow pets and if they have pet restrictions. Remember, requirements can change from what is listed online or in your campground directory.

3. Take a Test Drive.

Take your pet in the RV with you on small trips to the park. Your pet will learn to associate the RV with something fun and become more comfortable riding in the RV. But don’t take your pet somewhere and leave him alone for extended periods in the RV during this test phase.

4. Pack Your Pet’s Supplies.

Along with food and fresh water, pack some playthings, leashes, clean-up bags and comfortable bedding or a carrier. Also bring your vet’s information and a photo of your pet in case they get lost.

5. Make Plenty of Pit Stops.

Many rest areas have places designated especially for your pet – make sure to clean up after them. This is also the time to play with your pet and let them burn off some energy. During these rest stops, evaluate your pet’s health. If they look stressed or car sick, contact your veterinarian.

6. Be Courteous.

Show your appreciation to pet-friendly campgrounds and other pet-friendly businesses by respecting their rules.

7. Get Your Pet Involved.

Many RV parks and RV rallies have pet-centered activities like pet parades or dog-owner-look-alike contests. Find out what pet-friendly activities are available. If you plan on attending The Rally in Albuquerque next month, you and your pet should check out the 6th annual Dog Show: “Show Your Tricks on Route 66” where pets will compete in several creative categories.

Check out the Rally page on Facebook or join The Rally Facebook Group for more information on The Rally!

Leave a Reply

11 comments

  1. In addition, have your pet chipped by your vet. Keep record of the number for ID purposes. You pet can slip a collar or loose its’ tags.

    Also have your pet wear an ID tag that gives your last name, your cell phone number and e-mail address.

    At nite, have your pet wear a reflective or blinking collar or tag. This helps locating them when their are taking care of business in the dark or should slip out the door.

    Instead of keeping you pet in the RV 24/7 on a short leash while outside, carry along a portable exercise pen (ex-pen) so they can relax outdoors when your outdoors.

    If it is extremely hot outside, consider getting a water mister to keep you and your furry loved on more comfortable outside.

    WOOF!

  2. Wandell

    I recently inherited a cat, (by way of marriage) and she is a sweetheart, but has a BIG problem, she claws all furniture, shredds is more like it, and sheds big time. Never have I seen a cat that sheds so much, dander, hair and a fine fuzz– As you can see, I am not into cats. She has always travelled with my husband in the older motorhome, but when we married we bought a new motorhome and I don’t want the furniture shredded and hair flying everywhere and stuck in everything. I brush her constantly and always get a handful of fur and hair. No end to this. I have talked with the Vet and they have no clue. Do any of you long time RV.ers. have a solution to this? Surely I can’t be the only one with this problem. Please shae your thougths with me.. Thanks very much, a new Rv’er. Wandell

  3. Ann

    Remove the claws on the two front feet BEFORE the furniture is ruined. Bathe the cat once a week.

  4. Lelia

    Hi: I have declawed cats in the past and regretted it. I would NEVER do that again. I deal with the punctures and shreds because I love my cat more than I love my things. I do understand that not everyone feels that way and it is hard to see nice things destroyed. While I have not used them myself, a friend buys little vinyl caps made for this purpose and attaches them to the front claws of her cats to protect her furniture. I googled “declawing alternatives and found many links…here’s one.
    http://www.catscratching.com/

    Hope this helps. 🙂

  5. Vicki Perkins

    I have an 88 lb. Yellow Lab that goes everywhere I go in my coach. After a late night bout with diarrhea (which she managed to contain until I got her out) and an allegeric reaction to an insect bite, I purchased a wonderful book that now travels with us always. It is “The First Aid Companion for Dogs and Cats” by Amy D. Shojai. It discusses symptoms, emergency “human” medicines that can be used and common injuries and conditions. I ordered the book online from http://www.lakeside.com for only $7.95. I have ordered from this company before and have found them to be reliable. The book contains 439 pages and has been very informative to me.

  6. David Strouth

    We have a log-hair feline, and she has become familiar with 2x/day brushing, an dlooks forward to it! Although she’s an extremely sensitive cat and is not well-adjusted to the outdoors, we have to make special eforts to acclimate her…

    We’re in our first year of MH travel, and I plan to slowly adjust her to the “additional life” on the road. While I prep for the season, I’ll bring her aboard with some of her favorite things, including a very nice scratching post which she works out on daily, thus saving furniture. Although I’ve had felines all my life, and have practiced “de-clawing” in the past, I’ll never do so in the future – if you provide them with a great scratching post, and introduce them to regular brushing, you will have a very happy companion during your adventures.

    Feel free to contact me if you have questions or desire discussion. I have 40 years experience with felines….

    Good luck!!

  7. David Strouth

    We have a log-hair feline, and she has become familiar with 2x/day brushing, an dlooks forward to it! Although she’s an extremely sensitive cat and is not well-adjusted to the outdoors, we have to make special eforts to acclimate her…

    We’re in our first year of MH travel, and I plan to slowly adjust her to the “additional life” on the road. While I prep for the season, I’ll bring her aboard with some of her favorite things, including a very nice scratching post which she works out on daily, thus saving furniture. Although I’ve had felines all my life, and have practiced “de-clawing” in the past, I’ll never do so in the future – if you provide them with a great scratching post, and introduce them to regular brushing, you will have a very happy companion during your adventures.

    Feel free to contact me if you have questions or desire discussion. I have 40 years experience with felines….

    Good luck!!

    [email protected]

  8. Pingback: check out this cool website

  9. Pingback: url

  10. Pingback: zwembroeken heren

  11. Pingback: עיצוב גינות